TWO TOWERS PDF

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'Thus passes the heir of Denethor, Lord of the Tower of Guard! This is a bitter end . Now the Company is all in ruin. It is I that have failed. Vain was Gandalf's trust. “THE LORD OF THE RINGS Part Two THE TWO TOWERS cucurboldnegel.cfn * BOOK III * Chapter 1. The Departure of Boromir Aragorn sped on up the hill. HIGH WIDE AERIAL ON: CAMERA flies over the snow-covered peaks of the Misty . SAURON looks directly upon him from high atop THE TOWER OF.


Two Towers Pdf

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The Two Towers begins with Book III in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Frodo decides to take the burden of the Ring to Mount Doom by himself and not endanger. Here i have book that you looking for maybe can help you The Two Towers: Being the Second Part of The Lord of the Rings The standard hardcover edition of. They tell the whole story, those two towers on Tech Hill. For a hundred years they have stretched toward the sky in their telling, their own eloquent picture of the.

But between the wall and the downs we have found no other trace of them, and no trail has turned aside, this way or that, unless my skill has wholly left me. They may have been slain and burned among the Orcs; but that you will say cannot be, and I do not fear it. I can only think that they were carried off into the forest before the battle, even before you encircled your foes, maybe.

Can you swear that none escaped your net in such a way? The world is all grown strange. Elf and Dwarf in company walk in our daily fields; and folk speak with the Lady of the Wood and yet live; and the Sword comes back to war that was broken in the long ages ere the fathers of our fathers rode into the Mark!

How shall a man judge what to do in such times? It is a man's part to discern them, as much in the Golden Wood as in his own house. Yet I am not free to do all as I would.

It is against our law to let strangers wander at will in our land, until the king himself shall give them leave, and more strict is the command in these days of peril.

I have begged you to come back willingly with me, and you will not. Loth am I to begin a battle of one hundred against three.

Never in former days would any high lord of this land have constrained a man to abandon such a quest as mine. My duty at least is clear, to go on.

Aid us, or at the worst let us go free. Or seek to carry out your law. If you do so there will be fewer to return to your war or to your king. This is my choice.

You may go; and what is more, I will lend you horses. This only I ask: Thus you shall prove to him that I have not misjudged. In this I place myself, and maybe my very life, in the keeping of your good faith.

Do not fail. I would sooner walk than sit on the back of any beast so great, free or begrudged. Then all will be well, and you need neither borrow a horse nor be troubled by one. A great dark-grey horse was brought to Aragorn, and he mounted it. A smaller and lighter horse, but restive and fiery, was brought to Legolas. Arod was his name. But Legolas asked them to take off saddle and rein. Gimli was lifted up behind his friend. I have yet to teach you gentle speech.

With that they parted. Very swift were the horses of Rohan. Aragorn did not look back: Aragorn dismounted and surveyed the ground, then leaping back into the saddle, he rode away for some distance eastward, keeping to one side and taking care not to override the footprints. Then he again dismounted and examined the ground, going backwards and forwards on foot.

But this eastward trail is fresh and clear. There is no sign there of any feet going the other way, back towards Anduin. Now we must ride slower, and make sure that no trace or footstep branches off on either side. The Orcs must have been aware from this point that they were pursued; they may have made some attempt to get their captives away before they were overtaken.

As they rode forward the day was overcast. Low grey clouds came over the Wold. A mist shrouded the sun.

Ever nearer the tree-clad slopes of Fangorn loomed, slowly darkling as the sun went west. They saw no sign of any trail to right or left, but here and there they passed single Orcs, fallen in their tracks as they ran, with grey-feathered arrows sticking in back or throat.

At last as the afternoon was waning they came to the eaves of the forest, and in an open glade among the first trees they found the place of the great burning: Beside it was a great pile of helms and mail, cloven shields, and broken swords, bows and darts and other gear of war. Upon a stake in the middle was set a great goblin head; upon its shattered helm the white badge could still be seen. Further away, not far from the river, where it came streaming out from the edge of the wood, there was a mound.

It was newly raised: Aragorn and his companions searched far and wide about the field of battle, but the light faded, and evening soon drew down, dim and misty. By nightfall they had discovered no trace of Merry and Pippin. I would guess that the burned bones of the hobbits are now mingled with the Orcs'.

It will be hard news for Frodo, if he lives to hear it; and hard too for the old hobbit who waits in Rivendell. Elrond was against their coming. But I shall not depart from this place yet. In any case we must here await the morning-light. A little way beyond the battle-field they made their camp under a spreading tree: Gimli shivered. They had brought only one blanket apiece. Let the Orcs come as thick as summer-moths round a candle! Also we are on the very edge of Fangorn, and it is perilous to touch the trees of that wood, it is said.

Yet they passed the night after safely here, when their labour was ended.

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But our paths are likely to lead us into the very forest itself. So have a care! Cut no living wood! When the Dwarf had a small bright blaze going, the three companions drew close to it and sat together, shrouding the light with their hooded forms. Legolas looked up at the boughs of the tree reaching out above them. It may have been that the dancing shadows tricked their eyes, but certainly to each of the companions the boughs appeared to be bending this way and that so as to come above the flames, while the upper branches were stooping down; the brown leaves now stood out stiff, and rubbed together like many cold cracked hands taking comfort in the warmth.

There was a silence, for suddenly the dark and unknown forest, so near at hand, made itself felt as a great brooding presence, full of secret purpose. After a while Legolas spoke again. What are the fables of the forest that Boromir had heard? I had thought of asking you what was the truth of the matter.

And if an Elf of the Wood does not know, how shall a Man answer? Elrond says that the two are akin, the last strongholds of the mighty woods of the Elder Days, in which the Firstborn roamed while Men still slept. Yet Fangorn holds some secret of its own. What it is I do not know. They now drew lots for the watches, and the lot for the first watch fell to Gimli.

The others lay down. Almost at once sleep laid hold on them. But do not stray far in search of dead wood. Let the fire die rather! Call me at need! With that he fell asleep. Legolas already lay motionless, his fair hands folded upon his breast, his eyes unclosed, blending living night and deep dream, as is the way with Elves.

Gimli sat hunched by the fire, running his thumb thoughtfully along the edge of his axe. The tree rustled. There was no other sound. Suddenly Gimli looked up, and there just on the edge of the fire-light stood an old bent man, leaning on a staff, and wrapped in a great cloak; his wide-brimmed hat was pulled down over his eyes.

Gimli sprang up, too amazed for the moment to cry out, though at once the thought flashed into his mind that Saruman had caught them. Both Aragorn and Legolas, roused by his sudden movement, sat up and stared. The old man did not speak or make, sign. There was no trace of him to be found near at hand, and they did not dare to wander far.

The moon had set and the night was very dark. The horses were gone. They had dragged their pickets and disappeared. For me time the three companions stood still and silent, troubled by this new stroke of ill fortune. They were under the eaves of Fangorn, and endless leagues lay between them and the Men of Rohan, their only friends in this wide and dangerous land. As they stood, it seemed to them that they heard, far off in the night. Then all was quiet again, except for the cold rustle of the wind.

We started on our feet, and we have those still. Who else? Those were the words. He has gone off with our horses, or scared them away, and here we are. There is more trouble coming to us, mark my words! Still I do not doubt that you guess right, and that we are in peril here, by night or day. Yet in the meantime there is nothing that we can do but rest, while we may. I will watch for a while now, Gimli. I have more need of thought than of sleep.

The night passed slowly. Legolas followed Aragorn, and Gimli followed Legolas, and their watches wore away. But nothing happened. The old man did not appear again, and the horses did not return. Pippin lay in a dark and troubled dream: But instead of Frodo hundreds of hideous orc-faces grinned at him out of the shadows, hundreds of hideous arms grasped at him from every side.

Where was Merry? He woke. Cold air blew on his face. He was lying on his back.

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Evening was coming and the sky above was growing dim. He turned and found that the dream was little worse than the waking. His wrists, legs, and ankles were tied with cords. Beside him Merry lay, white-faced, with a dirty rag bound across his brows.

All about them sat or stood a great company of Orcs. Slowly in Pippin's aching head memory pieced itself together and became separated from dream-shadows. Of course: What had come over them? Why had they dashed off like that, taking no notice of old Strider? They had run a long way shouting--he could not remember how far or how long; and then suddenly they had crashed right into a group of Orcs: Then they yelled and dozens of other goblins had sprung out of the trees.

Merry and he had drawn their swords, but the Orcs did not wish to fight, and had tried only to lay hold of them, even when Merry had cut off several of their arms and hands. Good old Merry! Then Boromir had come leaping through the trees. He had made them fight. He slew many of them and the rest fled. But they had not gone far on the way back when they were attacked again. Boromir had blown his great horn till the woods rang, and at first the Orcs had been dismayed and had drawn back; but when no answer but the echoes came, they had attacked more fierce than ever.

Pippin did not remember much more. His last memo was of Boromir leaning against a tree, plucking out an arrow; then darkness fell suddenly. What has happened to Boromir? Why didn't the Orcs kill us? Where are we, and where are we going? He could not answer the questions. He felt cold and sick.

Just a nuisance: And now I have been stolen and I am just a piece of luggage for the Orcs. I hope Strider or someone will come and claim us! But ought I to hope for it? Won't that throw out all the plans?

I wish I could get free! He struggled a little, quite uselessly. One of the Orcs sitting near laughed and said something to a companion in their abominable tongue. We'll find a use for your legs before long. You'll wish you had got none before we get home. He had a black knife with a long jagged blade in his hand. Curse the Isengarders! Terrified Pippin lay still, though the pain at his wrists and ankles was growing, and the stones beneath him were boring into his back.

To take his mind off himself he listened intently to all that he could hear. There were many voices round about, and though orc-speech sounded at all times full of hate and anger, it seemed plain that something like a quarrel had begun, and was getting hotter.

To Pippin's surprise he found that much of the talk was intelligible many of the Orcs were using ordinary language. Apparently the members of two or three quite different tribes were present, and they could not understand one another's orc-speech. There was an angry debate concerning what they were to do now: They're a cursed nuisance, and we're in a hurry. Evening's coming on, and we ought to get a move on. That's my orders. I heard that one of them has got something, something that's wanted for the War, some elvish plot or other.

Anyway they'll both be questioned. Why don't we search them and find out? We might find something that we could use ourselves. The prisoners are not to be searched or plundered: I wish to kill, and then go back north. I command.

I return to Isengard by the shortest road. No, we must stick together. These lands are dangerous: You've no guts outside your own sties. But for us you'd all have run away. We are the fighting Uruk-hai! We slew the great warrior. We took the prisoners. We are the servants of Saruman the Wise, the White Hand: We came out of Isengard, and led you here, and we shall lead you back by the way we choose.

I have spoken. They might ask where his strange ideas came from. Did they come from Saruman, perhaps? Who does he think he is, setting up on his own with his filthy white badges? Saruman is a fool. But the Great Eye is on him.

How do you folk like being called swine by the muck-rakers of a dirty little wizard? It's orc-flesh they eat, I'll warrant. Many loud yells in orc-speech answered him, and the ringing clash of weapons being drawn. Cautiously Pippin rolled over, hoping to see what would happen. His guards had gone to join in the fray. Round them were many smaller goblins. Pippin supposed that these were the ones from the North. The others gave way, and one stepped backwards and fell over Merry's prostrate form with a curse.

It was the yellow-fanged guard. His body fell right on top of Pippin, still clutching its long saw-edged knife. We go straight west from here, and down the stair. From there straight to the downs, then along the river to the forest. And we march day and night.

That clear? The edge of the black knife had snicked his arm, and then slid down to his wrist. He felt the blood trickling on to his hand, but he also felt the cold touch of steel against his skin. The Orcs were getting ready to march again, but some of the Northerners were still unwilling, and the Isengarders slew two more before the rest were cowed.

There was much cursing and confusion. For the moment Pippin was unwatched. His legs were securely bound, but his arms were only tied about the wrists, and his hands were in front of him. He could move them both together, though the bonds were cruelly tight. He pushed the dead Orc to one side, then hardly daring to breathe, he drew the knot of the wrist-cord up and down against the blade of the knife. It was sharp and the dead hand held it fast.

The cord was cut! Quickly Pippin took it in his fingers and knotted it again into a loose bracelet of two loops and slipped it over his hands. Then he lay very still. If they are not alive when we get back, someone else will die too. An Orc seized Pippin like a sack. Another treated Merry in the same way. The Orc's clawlike hand gripped Pippin's arms like iron; the nails bit into him. He shut his eyes and slipped back into evil dreams.

Suddenly he was thrown on to the stony floor again. It was early night, but the slim moon was already falling westward. They were on the edge of a cliff that seemed to look out over a sea of pale mist. There was a sound of water falling nearby. But how long? You fools! You should have shot him. He'll raise the alarm. The cursed horsebreeders will hear of us by morning. Now we'll have to leg it double quick.

A shadow bent over Pippin. We have got to climb down and you must use your legs. Be helpful now. No crying out, no trying to escape. We have ways of paying for tricks that you won't like, though they won't spoil your usefulness for the Master.

He cut the thongs round Pippin's legs and ankles, picked him up by his hair and stood him on his feet. Several Orcs laughed. The pain in his legs and ankles vanished. He could stand. Pippin saw him go to Merry, who was lying close by, and kick him.

Merry groaned. Then he smeared the wound with some dark stuff out of a small wooden box. Merry cried out and struggled wildly. The Orcs clapped and hooted. We shall have some fun later. He needed speed and had to humour unwilling followers. He was healing Merry in orc-fashion; and his treatment worked swiftly.

When he had forced a drink from his flask down the hobbit's throat, cut his leg-bonds, and dragged him to his feet, Merry stood up, looking pale but grim and defiant, and very much alive. The gash in his forehead gave him no more trouble, but he bore a brown scar to the end of his days.

Where do we get bed and breakfast? Hold your tongues. No talk to one another.

Any trouble will be reported at the other end, and He'll know how to pay you. You'll get bed and breakfast all right: The orc-band began to descend a narrow ravine leading down into the misty plain below. Merry and Pippin, separated by a dozen Orcs or more, climbed down with them. At the bottom they stepped on to grass, and the hearts of the hobbits rose.

Sit on the grass and wait for the Whiteskins to join the picnic? Or you'll never see your beloved holes again. By the White Hand! What's the use of sending out mountain-maggots on a trip, only half trained. Run, curse you! Run while night lasts! Then the whole company began to run with the long loping strides of Orcs. They kept no order, thrusting, jostling, and cursing; yet their speed was very great. Each hobbit had a guard of three. Pippin was far back in the line. He wondered how long he would be able to go on at this pace: One of his guards had a whip.

But at present the orc-liquor was still hot in him. His wits, too, were wide-awake. Every now and again there came into his mind unbidden a vision of the keen face of Strider bending over a dark trail, and running, running behind. But what could even a Ranger see except a confused trail of orc-feet? His own little prints and Merry's were overwhelmed by the trampling of the iron-shod shoes before them and behind them and about them.

They had gone only a mile or so from the cliff when the land sloped down into a wide shallow depression, where the ground was soft and wet. Mist lay there, pale-glimmering in the last rays of the sickle moon. The dark shapes of the Orcs in front grew dim, and then were swallowed up. A sudden thought leaped into Pippin's mind, and he acted on it at once.

He swerved aside to the right, and dived out of the reach of his clutching guard, headfirst into the mist; he landed sprawling on the grass. There was for a moment turmoil and confusion. Pippin sprang up and ran. But the Orcs were after him. Some suddenly loomed up right in front of him.

Just as long arms and hard claws seized him. If the others have escaped, they've probably all gone with Frodo. Make 'em both run! Just use the whip as a reminder. Payment is only put off. Leg it! Neither Pippin nor Merry remembered much of the later part of the journey. Evil dreams and evil waking were blended into a long tunnel of misery, with hope growing ever fainter behind.

They ran, and they ran, striving to keep up the pace set by the Orcs, licked every now and again with a cruel thong cunningly handled. If they halted or stumbled, they were seized and dragged for some distance.

The warmth of the orc-draught had gone. Pippin felt cold and sick again. Suddenly he fell face downward on the turf. Hard hands with rending nails gripped and lifted him. He was carried like a sack once more, and darkness grew about him: Dimly he became aware of voices clamouring: He felt himself flung to the ground, and he lay as he fell, till black dreams took him. But he did not long escape from pain; soon the iron grip of merciless hands was on him again. For a long time he was tossed and shaken, and then slowly the darkness gave way, and he came back to the waking world and found that it was morning.

Orders were shouted and he was thrown roughly on the grass. There he lay for a while, fighting with despair. His head swam, but from the heat in his body he guessed that he had been given another draught.

An Orc stooped over him, and flung him some bread and a strip of raw dried flesh. He ate the stale grey bread hungrily, but not the meat. He was famished but not yet so famished as to eat flesh flung to him by an Orc, the flesh of he dared not guess what creature.

He sat up and looked about. Merry was not far away. They were by the banks of a swift narrow river. Ahead mountains loomed: A dark smudge of forest lay on the lower slopes before them. There was much shouting and debating among the Orcs; a quarrel seemed on the point of breaking out again between the Northerners and the Isengarders. Some were pointing back away south, and some were pointing eastward.

No killing, as I've told you before; but if you want to throw away what we've come all the way to get, throw it away! I'll look after it. Let the fighting Uruk-hai do the work, as usual. If you're afraid of the Whiteskins, run! There's the forest,' he shouted, pointing ahead. It's your best hope. Off you go! And quick, before I knock a few more heads off, to put some sense into the others.

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There was some cursing and scuffling, and then most of the Northerners broke away and dashed off, over a hundred of them, running wildly along the river towards the mountains. The hobbits were left with the Isengarders: A few of the larger and bolder Northerners remained with them. But that's all your fault, Snaga. You and the other scouts ought to have your ears cut off. But we are the fighters. We'll feast on horseflesh yet, or something better. At that moment Pippin saw why some of the troop had been pointing eastward.

They had a red eye painted on their shields. I'll see that orders are carried out in my command. And what else did you come back for? You went in a hurry.

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Did you leave anything behind? I knew you'd lead them into a mess. I've come to help them. The Whiteskins are coming. Has he had another mount shot under him? All that they make out! One day you'll wish that you had not said that. He won't let them show themselves across the Great River yet, not too soon. They're for the War-and other purposes. But in the meantime the Uruk-hai of Isengard can do the dirty work, as usual. Don't stand slavering there! Get your rabble together!

The other swine are legging it to the forest. You'd better follow. You wouldn't get back to the Great River alive.

Right off the mark! I'll be on your heels. The Isengarders seized Merry and Pippin again and slung them on their backs. Then the troop started off. Hour after hour they ran, pausing now and again only to sling the hobbits to fresh carriers.

Soon they were gaining also on the Northerners ahead. The forest began to draw nearer. Pippin was bruised and torn, his aching head was grated by the filthy jowl and hairy ear of the Orc that held him. Immediately in front were bowed backs, and tough thick legs going up and down, up and down, unresting, as if they were made of wire and horn, beating out the nightmare seconds of an endless time.

They were flagging in the rays of the bright sun, winter sun shining in a pale cool sky though it was; their heads were down and their tongues lolling out.

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The Whiteskins will catch you and eat you. They're coming! Horsemen, riding very swiftly, had indeed been sighted: The Isengarders began to run with a redoubled pace that astonished Pippin, a terrific spurt it seemed for the end of a race. Then he saw that the sun was sinking, falling behind the Misty Mountains; shadows reached over the land. The soldiers of Mordor lifted their heads and also began to put on speed. The forest was dark and close. Already they had passed a few outlying trees.

The land was beginning to slope upwards. They will escape,' thought Pippin. And then he managed to twist his neck. He saw that riders away eastward were already level with the Orcs, galloping over the plain. The sunset gilded their spears and helmets, and glinted in their pale flowing hair. They were hemming the Orcs in, preventing them from scattering, and driving them along the line of the river. He wondered very much what kind of folk they were.

He wished now that he had learned more in Rivendell, and looked more at maps and things; but in those days the plans for the journey seemed to be in more competent hands, and he had never reckoned with being cut off from Gandalf, or from Strider, and even from Frodo.

All that he could remember about Rohan was that Gandalf's horse, Shadowfax, had come from that land. That sounded hopeful, as far as it went.

I suppose I ought to be glad that the beastly Orcs look like being destroyed, but I would rather be saved myself.

A few of the riders appeared to be bowmen, skilled at shooting from a running horse. Riding swiftly into range they shot arrows at the Orcs that straggled behind, and several of them fell; then the riders wheeled away out of the range of the answering bows of their enemies, who shot wildly, not daring to halt.

This happened many times, and on one occasion arrows fell among the Isengarders. One of them, just in front of Pippin, stumbled and did not get up again. Night came down without the Riders closing in for battle. Many Orcs had fallen, but fully two hundred remained. In the early darkness the Orcs came to a hillock. The eaves of the forest were very near, probably no more than three furlongs away, but they could go no further. The horsemen had encircled them.

They're not to be killed, unless the filthy Whiteskins break through. As long as I'm alive, I want 'em. But they're not to cry out, and they're not to be rescued. Bind their legs! The last part of the order was carried out mercilessly.

But Pippin found that for the first time he was close to Merry. The Orcs were making a great deal of noise, shouting and clashing their weapons, and the hobbits managed to whisper together for a while. Don't think I could crawl away far, even if I was free. I've got some. Have you? I don't think they've taken anything but our swords. Anyway I can't put my mouth in my pocket!

I've-'; but just then a savage kick warned Pippin that the noise had died down, and the guards were watchful. The night was cold and still. All round the knoll on which the Orcs were gathered little watch-fires sprang up, golden-red in the darkness, a complete ring of them. They were within a long bowshot. The riders made no sound. Later in the night when the moon came out of the mist, then occasionally they could be seen, shadowy shapes that glinted now and again in the white light, as they moved in ceaseless patrol.

Curse you! You're as bad as the other rabble: No good trying to charge with them. They'd just squeal and bolt, and there are more than enough of these filthy horse-boys to mop up our lot on the flat. But these Whiteskins have better night-eyes than most Men, from all I've heard; and don't forget their horses! They can see the night-breeze, or so it's said. Still there's one thing the fine fellows don't know: They posted a few watchers, but most of them lay on the ground, resting in the pleasant darkness.

It did indeed become very dark again; for the moon passed westward into thick cloud, and Pippin could not see anything a few feet away. The fires brought no light to the hillock.

The riders were not, however, content merely to wait for the dawn and let their enemies rest. A sudden outcry on the east side of the knoll showed that something was wrong. It seemed that some of the Men had ridden in close, slipped off their horses, crawled to the edge of the camp and killed several Orcs, and then had faded away again. Pippin and Merry sat up. But if the hobbits had any thought of escape, it was soon dashed. A long hairy arm took each of them by the neck and drew them close together.

He began to paw them and feel them. Pippin shuddered as hard cold fingers groped down his back. Or not? A little awkwardly placed, perhaps: There was a light like a pale but hot fire behind his eyes. The thought came suddenly into Pippin's mind, as if caught direct from the urgent thought of his enemy: What are you talking about, little one?

For a moment Pippin was silent. Then suddenly in the darkness he made a noise in his throat: Very ve-ry dangerous, my little ones. Still you know your own business best. Do you want it, or not? And what would you give for it? Do I want it? What do you mean? We could save you time and trouble. But you must untie our legs first, or we'll do nothing, and say nothing. You'll wish there was more that you could tell to satisfy the Questioner, indeed you will: We shan't hurry the enquiry.

Oh dear no! What do you think you've been kept alive for? My dear little fellows, please believe me when I say that it was not out of kindness: And it doesn't seem to be going your way, whatever happens.

Saruman will take all that he can find. If you want anything for yourself, now's the time to do a deal. The name of Saruman seemed specially to enrage him. Time was passing and the disturbance was dying down. They felt the Orc's arms trembling violently. I'll untie every string in your bodies. Do you think I can't search you to the bones? Search you! I'll cut you both to quivering shreds. I don't need the help of your legs to get you away-and have you all to myself! Suddenly he seized them.

The strength in his long arms and shoulders was terrifying. He tucked them one under each armpit, and crushed them fiercely to his sides; a great stifling hand was clapped over each of their mouths. Then he sprang forward, stooping low. Quickly and silently he went, until he came to the edge of the knoll. There, choosing a gap between the watchers, he passed like an evil shadow out into the night, down the slope and away westward towards the river that flowed out of the forest.

In that direction there was a wide open space with only one fire. After going a dozen yards he halted, peering and listening. Nothing could be seen or heard. He crept slowly on, bent almost double. Then he squatted and listened again. Then he stood up, as if to risk a sudden dash. At that very moment the dark form of a rider loomed up right in front of him. A horse snorted and reared. A man called out.

No doubt he meant to kill his captives, rather than allow them to escape or to be rescued; but it was his undoing. The sword rang faintly, and glinted a little in the light of the fire away to his left.

An arrow came whistling out of the gloom: He dropped the sword and shrieked. He gave a hideous shivering cry and lay still. Another horseman came riding swiftly to his comrade's aid. Whether because of some special keenness of sight, or because of some other sense, the horse lifted and sprang lightly over them; but its rider did not see them, lying covered in their elven-cloaks, too crushed for the moment, and too afraid to move. At last Merry stirred and whispered softly: The answer came almost immediately.

From the yells and screeches that came from the knoll the hobbits guessed that their disappearance had been discovered: Then suddenly the answering cries of orc-voices came from the right, outside the circle of watch-fires, from the direction of the forest and the mountains. There was the sound of galloping horses. The Riders were drawing in their ring close round the knoll, risking the orc-arrows, so as to prevent any sortie, while a company rode off to deal with the newcomers.

Suddenly Merry and Pippin realized that without moving they were now outside the circle: But I can't touch the knots, and I can't bite them. I've managed to free my hands. These loops are only left for show. You'd better have a bit of lembas first. He slipped the cords off his wrists, and fished out a packet. The cakes were broken, but good, still in their leaf-wrappings.

The hobbits each ate two or three pieces. The taste brought back to them the memory of fair faces, and laughter, and wholesome food in quiet days now far away. For a while they ate thoughtfully, sitting in the dark, heedless of the cries and sounds of battle nearby. Pippin was the first to come back to the present.

With this he quickly cut their bonds. But in any case we had better start by crawling. They crawled. The turf was deep and yielding, and that helped them: They gave the watch-fire a wide berth, and wormed their way forward bit by bit, until they came to the edge of the river, gurgling away in the black shadows under its deep banks.

Then they looked back. The sounds had died away. The spandrel plates were located at each floor, transmitting shear stress between columns, allowing them to work together in resisting lateral loads. The joints between modules were staggered vertically, so that the column splices between adjacent modules were not at the same floor.

The large, column-free space between the perimeter and core was bridged by prefabricated floor trusses. The floors supported their own weight as well as live loads , providing lateral stability to the exterior walls and distributing wind loads among the exterior walls. A grid of lightweight bridging trusses and main trusses supported the floors. The top chords of the trusses were bolted to seats welded to the spandrels on the exterior side and a channel welded to the core columns on the interior side.

The floors were connected to the perimeter spandrel plates with viscoelastic dampers that helped reduce the amount of sway felt by building occupants. Hat trusses or "outrigger trusses" located from the th floor to the top of the buildings were designed to support a tall communication antenna on top of each building. This truss system allowed some load redistribution between the perimeter and core columns and supported the transmission tower.

Davenport to develop viscoelastic dampers to absorb some of the sway. These viscoelastic dampers, used throughout the structures at the joints between floor trusses and perimeter columns along with some other structural modifications, reduced the building sway to an acceptable level. Kyle, Jr. When the trench was dug out, a steel cage was inserted and concrete was poured in, forcing the "slurry" out.

It took fourteen months for the slurry wall to be completed. It was necessary before excavation of material from the interior of the site could begin. Its site was the location of Radio Row, home to hundreds of commercial and industrial tenants, property owners, small businesses, and approximately residents, many of whom fiercely resisted forced relocation. Wien , expressed concerns about this much "subsidized" office space going on the open market, competing with the private sector, when there was already a glut of vacancies.

For example, in his book The Pentagon of Power , Lewis Mumford denounced the center as an "example of the purposeless giantism and technological exhibitionism that are now eviscerating the living tissue of every great city". This involved replacing marble pavers with gray and pink granite stones, adding new benches, planters, new restaurants, food kiosks and outdoor dining areas. The Twin Towers became known worldwide, appearing in numerous movies and television shows as well as on postcards and other merchandise It became a New York icon, in the same league as the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and the Statue of Liberty.

During a press conference in , Yamasaki was asked, "Why two story buildings? Why not one story building? Visitors were required to pass through security checks added after the World Trade Center bombing. The Port Authority renovated the observatory in , then leased it to Ogden Entertainment to operate. Attractions added to the observation deck included a simulated helicopter ride around the city.A cairn we might build. All night the three companions scrambled in this bony land, climbing to the crest of the first and tallest ridge, and down again into the darkness of a deep winding valley on the other side.

But our paths are likely to lead us into the very forest itself. Then they looked back. He'll raise the alarm. Hardy is the race of Elendil! But if you come to the king's house, you shall see for yourself. Often in their hearts they thanked the Lady of Lurien for the gift of lembas, for they could eat of it and find new strength even as they ran.

Why don't we search them and find out? The moon had long gone down before them, the stars glittered above them; the first light of day had not yet come over the dark hills behind.